Articles

  • False moult, causes, effects and remedies

    1. What are the causes ?

    False moult is not a disease ! It is caused by a sudden change: Light, temperature, draft or stress.

    2. The effects of a false moult

    The zebrafinch enters a period of out-of-season moulting which will weaken it. To be avoided during breeding or competition period.
    The bird victim of a false molt will need a supply of vitamins and minerals to help regrowth of the feathers.

    3. A remedy used by breeders

    To remedy this false moult, there is a method used by breeders which consists of letting a peeled and cut onion macerate in a liter of water for 3 to 4 days (protected from light).
    Then, put a tablespoon of the juice obtained in a liter of water and distribute in the drinking trough for a week, renewing this mixture every day.

     

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  • The foniopaddy

    1. Nutritional composition

    Nutritional value per 100 gr :
    Crude protein 9 gr; Carbohydrate 75 gr; Fat 1.8 gr; Crude fiber 3.3 gr; Crude ash 3.4 gr.

    Mineral value per 100 gr :
    Calcium 44 mg; Phosphorus 177 mg; Iron 8.5 mg.

    Vitamins per 100 gr :
    Thiamine (B1) 470.5 mg; Riboflavin (B2) 100.1 mg; Niacin (B3) 190.9 mg.

    Amino acids :
    2.5% cysteine; Isoleucine 4.1%; Leucine 11.4%; Lysine 2.5%; Methionine 4.5%; Phenylalanine 6.3%; Threonine 3.7%; 1.6% tryptophan; Tyrosine 3.5%; Valine 5.5%.

    Energy value : 1541 KJ

    2. Study and effects of the seed

     

    According to the links below, research has shown that foniopaddy has an anti-coccidiosis effect.

    - Le foniopaddy
    -
    Fonio paddy, une graine miracle ?

     

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  • Classification, origin, behavior of zebrafinch (wild form)

    1. Classification

    (Source: International Ornithological Congress C.O.I.)

    • Order : Passeriformes
    • Family : Estrildity
    • Genus : Taeniopygia
    • Species : Guttata
    • Subspecies : Taeniopygia guttata

    Zebrafinch (Taeniopygia guttata), sometimes referred to as Mandarin for short, is the most common and familiar estrildity in central Australia.

    2. Subspecies and distribution

    There are two distinct subspecies.
    Taeniopygia guttata guttata, the Timorese zebrafinch, ranges from Lombok in the Sunda Islands or Nusa Tanggara in Indonesia to Sermata, in addition to coastal areas around mainland Australia.
    The other subspecies is Taeniopygia gutatta castonatis. The latter is found over much of mainland Australia and some of these varieties are considered domestic.

    The morphological differences between the two subspecies include differences in size.
    Taeniopygia guttata guttata is smaller (8 cm) than Taeniopygia guttata castanotis and does not bear the same distinguishing mark on the throat and upper part of the breast.

     

    3. Description

    This bird measures 8 to 10 cm (wild form) or 12 to 14 cm (domestic form) for a mass of about 15g.

    4. Longevity

    This bird can live for 7 to 10 years. It is a robust bird that can withstand temperatures of -15 ° C, knowing that it can survive at least + 40 ° C.

    5. Habitat

    Zebra finches inhabit Australia's open steppes with scattered bushes and trees, but have adapted to human disturbance, taking advantage of man-made water holes, and spaces opened up by deforestation. They go to cities and show up all over Australia.

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  • Where does my passion for breeding birds come from ?

    Welcome,

    My passion for breeding birds has been passed down to me from father to son. Indeed my grandfather, at the time arrived from Italy, liked to breed canaries for his pleasure. His children: My father and my uncles also have or raise birds (pigeons, straight beaks, canaries, hooks).
    I also spent my childhood in Coulogne (France), a small town known for its numerous pigeon farms, the "Colombophiles Coulonneux".

    So after a youth "bathed" in the breeding of birds of all kinds, I discovered at 12 years old the different colors of zebrafinch in books. A little later, around 14 years old, I was lucky enough to meet a zebrafinch breeder near my home known for his multiple world championship titles on display. He taught me the basics of genetics, gave me my first zebrafinch of show, etc. What motivated me to go further !

    I love above all what this passion teaches me: Patience and humility. Qualities that seem to me undeniable to progress in the selection of strains.

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